Curl Curl - Beach in Curl Curl Warringah NSW - SLS Beachsafe

Curl Curl NSW

Curl Curl (NSW 315) is an exposed energetic 1.2 km long beach, backed originally by large dunes, which were destabilised early last century. The northern dunes were partly removed during the World War 2, then used as a tip and finally returned to a somewhat natural state in the 1980s,... Read more

Curl Curl (NSW 315) is an exposed energetic 1.2 km long beach, backed originally by large dunes, which were destabilised early last century. The northern dunes were partly removed during the World War 2, then used as a tip and finally returned to a somewhat natural state in the 1980s, so that Curl Curl, only 12 km from central Sydney, still has a relatively natural appearance. The southern Curl Curl SLSC was formed in 1918 followed by North Curl Curl in 1922. Today the central and northern end are given over to a foreshore reserve, with a large car park next to the North Curl Curl SLSC and along the central section, while to the south the road runs close behind the beach with parking either side of the surf club and on the southern headland. At South Curl Curl the club's first surf carnival in 1921 was marred by huge seas, the second later in the year by a shark. To provide safer swimming the club was active in the construction of the rock pool in 1925, with the North Curl Curl rock pool constructed in 1936-37 and accessed via a walkway to the point.The beach is bordered by 50 m high Dee Why Head and the lower sandstone rocks at south Curl Curl. It faces the east-southeast and receives all southerly swell with waves averaging 1.6 m. These maintain a single bar usually cut by five beach rips and permanent rips against each headland (Fig. 4.213 & 4.214). Because of the higher waves the bar is often separated from the beach by a continuous trough occupied by the rips and their feeder currents. The southern end of the beach receives equally high waves and has rocks and reef in the surf off the point. Some regard this as Sydney's most dangerous beach. Its most notable hazard is the infamous Garbage Bowl, the permanent southern rip which runs out into the swell and over rock creating a rough ride seaward.

Swimming

Definitely stay between the flags at both ends of the beach and away from the rips, or in the rock pool.

Surfing

North Curlie as the locals call it can usually produce a wave when there is little else around. With low to moderate swell it can generate some good beach breaks along the entire beach, but is blown out in southerlies. South Curlie also offers beach breaks and a regular swell. Best is in the south just north of the main rip, with other breaks up the beach. The entire beach is exposed to southerly winds.

Fishing

Deep rip gutters are found right along the beach, with the largest running out past the southern rock pool. Good easily accessible shore platforms are located at either end and are popular, though potentially hazardous spots.

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Patrolled Patrolled Today Change Day

South Curl Curl SLSC

Mon

20/11

Tue

21/11

Wed

22/11

Thu

23/11

Fri

24/11

Sat

25/11

Sun

26/11

-

-

-

-

-

09:00 - 17:00

09:00 - 17:00

South Curl Curl (Lifeguards)

Mon

20/11

Tue

21/11

Wed

22/11

Thu

23/11

Fri

24/11

Sat

25/11

Sun

26/11

09:00 - 17:00

09:00 - 17:00

09:00 - 17:00

09:00 - 17:00

09:00 - 17:00

09:00 - 17:00

09:00 - 17:00

Information

About

Curl Curl, NSW 2096

Includes beaches:
Curl Curl Beach, North Curl Curl

Length:
0.8km

General Beach Hazard Rating:
7/10 (Highly hazardous)

Beach Key:
 nsw315B

Nearby beaches

Hazards

  • Sharks
    Sharks
  • Bluebottles
    Bluebottles
  • Topographic rips
    Topographic rips
  • Strong Currents
    Strong Currents

Information Symbols

  • Formal parking area
  • Drinking water
  • Toilets
  • Dressing shed
  • Showers
  • Pool
  • Kiosk
  • Public phone
  • Park
  • Bus

Weather

Tuesday 21, Nov 5:49 am

Day 23°    Night 18°
19.2°C
Possible late shower

Water Temperature  20°C


Swell


Wind


Wind: East to southeasterly 10 to 15 knots.
Swell: Easterly 1 to 1.5 metres, decreasing to around 1 metre during the afternoon.
Seas: Around 1 metre.
Weather: Partly cloudy. 30% chance of a shower.

Tide

10 am
1.66m
4 am
0.50m
11 pm
1.24m
5 pm
0.36m

UV

Index: 11 (Extreme)

Sun protection recommended from 8:40 am to 4:30 pm


Radar

128 km

radar helper

Weather

Wednesday 22, Nov

Day 23°    Night 17°
Shower or two

Swell


Wind


Wind: Easterly 10 to 15 knots tending northeasterly in the late evening.
Swell: Easterly around 1 metre.
Seas: Below 1 metre.
Weather: Partly cloudy. 60% chance of showers.

Tide

11 am
1.61m
5 am
0.55m
6 pm
0.39m

UV

Index: 10 (Very High)

Sun protection recommended from 8:40 am to 4:30 pm


Weather

Tue 21, Nov to Tue 28, Nov


Swell


Wind


Wind: Northeasterly about 10 knots increasing to 15 to 20 knots during the afternoon.
Swell: Easterly around 1 metre.
Seas: Around 1 metre, increasing to 1 to 1.5 metres during the evening.
Weather: Partly cloudy. 30% chance of a shower. The chance of a thunderstorm in the morning and afternoon.

Tide


UV

Tue 21st 10 (Very High) Sun protection recommended from 8:40 am to 4:20 pm
Wed 22nd 10 (Very High) Sun protection recommended from 8:40 am to 4:30 pm
Thu 23rd 10 (Very High) Sun protection recommended from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm
Fri 24th 11 (Extreme) Sun protection recommended from 8:40 am to 4:30 pm

SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate.

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