Weather Forecast
13.20°C
Current Temperature
22.00km/h
Wind speed
22.00°C
Water Temperature
2.04m
Swell
0.27m
Tide
3/11
UV
Thirroul Beach (NSW 363) became a popular beach at the turn of the 20th century. Alarmed at the increasing number of rescues being performed, the locals formed one of the first surf clubs outside of Sydney in 1908. The next year the first surf carnival on the south coast attracted 2000 people. Today Thirroul can cater to large crowds. The entire beach is backed by a wide, grassed reserve offering parking, parks, playgrounds and picnic areas. A large park also surrounds the now drained lagoon behind the northern end of the beach. The Thirroul SLSC occupies the centre, with dressing sheds and a full size Olympic pool and wading pool next door. The beach is 1 km long and faces the east-southeast. In the north low headlands fronted by wide rock platforms separate it from Austinmer, while in the south a pipeline and a few rocks at the base of low bluffs divide it from South Thirroul. Waves average 1-1.5 m usually maintaining a single bar cut by six rips, including permanent rips against the boundary rocks (Fig. 4.285 & 4.286). The bar detaches during and following high waves to form a continuous trough whose currents feed the rips.
Beach Length: 1km
General Hazard Rating: 6/11

Patrolled Beach Flag Patrols

There are currently no services provided by Surf Life Saving Australia for this beach. Please take the time to browse the Surf Safety section of this website to learn more about staying safe when swimming at Australian beaches. Click here to visit general surf education information.

Information

Formal parking area
Formal parking area
Showers
Change Rooms
Public phone
Toilets Block M/F
Kiosk
Pool
Shops
Park
Drinking water
Train

Regulations

Hazards

Topographic rips

Weather

SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate.